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INVESTIGATIVE SERVICES

California Association of Licensed Investigators

New Mexico Regulation & Licensing Department

Bureau of Security and Investigative Services

National Association of Investigative Services

National Association of Investigative Specialists

Central Crime Analysis Unit

 

Did you know “Q” is

the only letter that

doesn’t appear in

any U.S. state name?

CALIFORNIA LINKS

California Victim Compensation Board

Los Angeles County Victims of Crime

Orange County Victims of Crime

 

San Diego County Victim Services

 

Identity Theft Resource

 

Map of California Gangs

California Beaches

NEW MEXICO LINKS

Administrative Office of the District Attorneys

National Assn. of VOCA Assistance Administrators

National Organization for Victim Assistance

National Criminal Justice Reference Service

NM Mothers Against Drunk Driving

New Mexico Coalition Against Domestic Violence

New Mexico Coalition of Sexual Assault Programs

New Mexico Drug Card/Prescription Assistance

Office for Victims of Crime

Other State Compensation Programs

OVC Online Directory of Crime Victim Services

Violence Against Women Grants Office

Coalition to Stop Violence Against Native Women

NM Legal Aid

The NM Crisis & Access Line

New Mexico Office of the Medical Investigator

NM Resource Center for Victims of Violent Death

NM VINE Victim Information and Notification Everyday

NM Statewide Victim Information & Notification

Office for Victims of Crime

National Sexual Violence Resource Center

National Center for Victims of Crime

Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services

Pulltogether.org

 

GOVERNMENT

United States Forest Service 

A multi-faceted agency that manages and protects 154 national forests and 20 grasslands in 43 states and Puerto Rico. The agency’s mission is to sustain the health, diversity, and productivity of the nation’s forests and grasslands to meet the needs of present and future generations.

 

Bureau of Ocean Energy Management

The Mission of the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management is to manage the development of U.S. Outer Continental Shelf energy and mineral resources in an environmentally and economically responsible way.

United States Department of Agriculture

The focus of the Center's information products, services, and activities is to help the regulated community with employee training and to promote the humane care and use of animals by providing information on alternatives (improved methods of animal experimentation that could reduce or replace animal use or minimize pain and distress to animals). AWIC also supports other USDA agencies, such as the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, Animal Care, and the Agricultural Research Service.

Missing Pet Network (MPN)

The MPN is a group of volunteers sponsored by the USDA Animal Care Office who help people find missing pet animals.  We accept no money, make no endorsements,  and use no advertising on our MPN web pages.

 

Alternatives to Animal Testing

Altweb, the Alternatives to Animal Testing Web Site, was created to serve as a gateway to alternative news, information, and resources on the Internet and beyond.

         Did you know Antarctica is

           covered in a sheet of ice 

             that's 7,000 feet thick?

 

 

 

 

Office of Laboratory Animal Welfare 

The Office of Laboratory Animal Welfare (OLAW) provides guidance and interpretation of the Public Health Service (PHS) Policy on Humane Care and Use of Laboratory Animals, supports educational programs and monitors compliance with the Policy by Assured institutions and PHS funding components to ensure the humane care and use of animals in PHS-supported research, testing, and training, thereby contributing to the quality of PHS-supported activities.

Fish and Wildlife Proposed Rules

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service's mission is, working with others to conserve, protect and enhance fish, wildlife, and plants and their habitats for the continuing benefit of the American people.

U.S. Government Services and Information 

USA.gov is your online guide to government information and services.

 

U.S Citizenship and Immigration Services 

Created as a separate bureau by the Homeland Security Act of 2002, USCIS allows the DHS to improve the administration of benefits and immigration services for applicants by exclusively focusing on immigration and citizenship services.

 

Internal Revenue Service (IRS) 

The Internal Revenue Service (IRS) is the revenue service of the United States federal government. The IRS is responsible for collecting taxes and the interpretation and enforcement of the IRC (Internal Revenue Code)

Administration for Children & Families 

The Administration of Children & Familes with the Department of Health and Human Services is responsibility to assuring that assistance in obtaining support (both financial and medical) is available to children through locating parents, establishing paternity and support obligations, and enforcing those obligations. 

 

Small Business Administration (SBA) 

The Small Business Administration aids, counsels, assists and protects the interests of small businesses and helps people start, build and grow businesses.  

 

Office of Women's Business Ownership 

The Office of Women's Business Ownership and the Women's Business Center assist women achieve their dreams and improve their communities by helping them start and run successful businesses, regardless of social or financial disadvantage, race, ethnicity or business background.

Business USA.Government 

The official business link to the U.S. Government. It was developed to provide better customer service for small businesses interacting with the Federal Government.

Free Grants for Veterans 

These grants are free, and they could help low-income veterans with bills, mortgages, rent, housing, college, and medications. Please note that grants are only for veterans who can prove financial difficulties. 

Mesothelioma & Veteran 

Due to the military’s widespread use of asbestos between the 1930s and early 1980s, veterans today have higher rates of mesothelioma than the general population.​

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Did you know? The trains at Disneyland are made of

cooking oil from the resort’s

restaurants and hotels?

Did you know that Elvis did his first and only radio commercial on this date for Southern Maid Donuts in Shreveport, Louisiana, on November 6, 1954?

Becky was fortunate to have seen him in concert when she was eleven. 

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Private-Investigation-Degree-City-Colleg

Did you know that to date, just five states do not require private investigators to be licensed at the state level:

Alaska

Idaho

Mississippi

South Dakota

Wyoming

The remaining 45 states (plus the District of Columbia) do license PIs, and therefore have specific licensing requirements, which include education and experience requirements, application procedures, and renewal procedures. Further, a select number of states allow private investigators to carry weapons; as such, mandatory firearms training, certification, and certification renewal are commonplace.

Generally, minimum requirements for state licensure include: being at least 21 (some states have age requirements as old as 25); possessing a high school diploma or the equivalent; and have U.S. citizenship or residency. Most states also have strict statutes prohibiting candidates who have felony convictions or misdemeanor convictions involving crimes of moral turpitude from becoming private investigators.

ANIMAL RIGHTS AND RESOURCES 

Did you know a time capsule was buried at the Sleeping Beauty Castle in 1995?

No one knows exactly what’s inside, but we’ll find out when it is unearthed during the park’s 80th anniversary on July 17, 2035.

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  • A sneeze generates a wind of 166 km/hr (100 mi/hr), and a cough moves out at 100 km/hr (60 mi/hr).

  • Our heart beats around 100,00 times every day or about 30 million times in a year.

  • Our blood is on a 60,000-mile journey per day.

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AUTISM FAMILIES

 

100 Days Kit, Autism Speaks

This kit provides information to help families get through the first steps of an autism diagnosis.

 

Autism Source, Autism Society of America (ASA)

ASA’s Autism Source is a database of resources in local communities. It includes contact information for ASA chapters and other local supports.

 

Autism NOW
Autism Now is an initiative of The Arc and The Administration on Developmental Disabilities. This national autism resource and information center is a central point of resources and information for individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) and other developmental disabilities, their families, and other key stakeholders.

 

Autism Wandering Awareness Alerts Response Education (AWAARE)

Working to prevent wandering incidents and deaths within the autism community.

 

Department of Education

The Department of Education (ED) has resources to assist with the educational needs of children with autism spectrum disorders and other disabilities. 

 

The ED’s Special Education Technical Assistance and Dissemination Network links to a variety of websites and online resources that focus on special education issues, such as policy, technology, curriculum, and parent trainings. In addition, the Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services (OSERS) within the ED has resources for parents and individuals, school districts, and states in the areas of special education, vocational rehabilitation, and research.

 

Life Journey Through Autism Series, Organization for Autism Research (OAR)
OAR has published five Life Journey guidebooks and The Best of The OARacle to date. You can read their descriptions, preview each online, or download copies at no cost. Most are available in Spanish.

  • A Parent’s Guide to Assessment
    This guide helps parents understand the assessment process and learn how to use assessment results to improve their child’s services.

  • A Parent’s Guide to Research

  • This guide helps parents find, understand, and evaluate autism research studies.

  • A Guide for Transition to Adulthood
    This guide provides an overview of the transition from school to adulthood.

 

Mental Health Services Locator, National Mental Health Information Center
The Mental Health Services Locator helps families and professionals find information about mental health services and resources by state and/or region. The National Mental Health Information Center is part of the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration of the Department of Health and Human Services.

 

Operation Autism for Military Families
Operation Autism is a web-based resource specifically designed and created to support military families that have children with autism. It is from the Organization for Autism Research (OAR) and the American Legion Child Welfare Foundation.

 

School Accreditation, National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC)
NAEYC provides accreditation for schools that meet certain standards, as well as resources, tools, and information for families and childcare providers.

 

State Programs, National Dissemination Center for Children with Disabilities
Locate organizations and agencies within each state that address disability-related issues. NICHCY has compiled a resource directory by state that lists key programs for children with developmental disabilities and their families. The lists include state agencies serving children and youth with disabilities, state chapters of disability organizations and parent groups, and parent training and information projects.

FINANCIAL RESOURCES FOR HEALTH CARE

 

Children’s Health Insurance Program

Insure Kids Now! is a national campaign to link the nation’s 10 million uninsured children–from birth to age 18–to free and low-cost health insurance. It is sponsored by the Department of Health and Human Services. Each state has a Children’s Health Insurance Program that provides free or low-cost health insurance for eligible children. The website has basic facts about these programs as well as links to every state’s program for children. The site also has information on where you can learn who is eligible for the program, how to apply, and what services are covered.

 

GovBenefits.gov
GovBenefits.gov is a partnership of Federal agencies with a shared vision – to provide improved, personalized access to government assistance programs. This website can help you determine if there are government benefits you can receive.

 

Medicaid

Medicaid is a federal program that helps certain groups of people pay for medical care. Each state regulates its own Medicaid program, so the rules may be slightly different state-to-state. To get information, contact the Medicaid office in your state.

 

The Arc Medicaid Reference Desk
The Medicaid Reference Desk is a tool to help people with intellectual and developmental disabilities find out what Medicaid can offer them. It is a project of The Arc and the Administration on Developmental Disabilities.

 

Social Security Benefits

This booklet is for the parents, caregivers or representatives of children under age 18 who have disabilities that might make them eligible for Supplemental Security Income (SSI) payments. It is also for adults who became disabled in childhood and who might be entitled to Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) benefits. (SSDI benefit is called a “child’s” benefit because it is paid on a parent’s Social Security earnings record.)

 

Sound Advice on Autism
To answer parents’ questions about autism spectrum disorders, the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) offers a collection of interviews with pediatricians, researchers and parents.

 

Special Needs Trust/Estate Planning
Plan ahead for your child’s financial future by writing a specialized will and preparing other documents that will help your child access his or her government benefits when you are gone.

 

DISASTER PLANNING

 

AutismCares 
A growing number of national autism organizations partnered to form AutismCares, a national initiative to help families with members who have autism that are challenged with disasters in their community. AutismCares registers families through a free online service to help manage and store their health care records and ensure that trained case managers are able to locate them more effectively in case disaster strikes their community.

Assistive Technology

 

People who have an autism spectrum disorder may use assistive technology (AT). AT is any item that helps people do things in their daily lives. Examples of AT devices include a keyguard that helps children find the right keys on a computer keyboard, a simpler remote control for a TV or stereo, an adapted mouse that makes getting around on the computer easier, switches that help children play with toys, and talking books.

 

Assistive Devices, MEDLINEplus
MEDLINEplus is an online service of the National Library of Medicine and the National Institutes of Health. Updated daily, the site offers information on a range of health topics, including autism and assistive device.

 

 

HEALTHCARE PROVIDERS

Screening and Diagnosis

 

Caring for Children With Autism Spectrum Disorders: A Resource Toolkit for Clinicians
A clinical resource to assist in the recognition, evaluation, and ongoing management of autism spectrum disorders throughout the patient’s lifespan from the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP).

 

Developmental Screening/Testing Coding

Developmental screening, surveillance, and assessment are often complemented by the use of special tests, which vary in length. 

 

Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders
The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM), published by the American Psychiatric Association, is the standard classification of mental disorders used by mental health professionals in the United States.

 

EARLY INTERVENTIONS

Act Early on Developmental Concerns: Partnering with Early Intervention
A presentation that offers health care providers a general overview of early intervention services as well as practical tips, resources, and tools for working with early intervention and community services from the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP).

 

Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics Online
Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics Online is for professionals interested in child development and behavior in a medical setting. The website focuses on primary care development and behavior, including early intervention and screening, and provides articles, handouts, and materials about developmental disabilities developed for professionals and parents. It also offers a practice section with information to support primary and specialty health care practice.

 

Association of University Centers on Disabilities
The Association of University Centers on Disabilities is network of interdisciplinary centers advancing policy and practice for and with individuals with developmental and other disabilities, their families, and communities.

 

Health Resources and Services Administration
The Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA), an agency of the Department of Health and Human Services, improves access to health care services for people who are uninsured, isolated, or medically vulnerable. HRSA provides leadership and financial support to health care providers in every state and U.S. territory.

 

National Center of Medical Home Initiatives for Children with Special Needs

The National Center of Medical Home Initiatives for Children with Special Needs works with federal agencies to ensure that children with special needs have access to a medical home. Its website has resources, information, and tools on providing medical homes for children and youth with special health care needs.

 

EDUCATORS

 

Autism and Asperger Syndrome Educator’s Guides, Organization for Autism Research (OAR)
These guides provide teachers and other education professionals with a plan for teaching a child with autism or Asperger syndrome in the general classroom setting. In addition to these guides, OAR has other tips for educators on its website.

 

The Center on the Social and Emotional Foundations for Early Learning (CSEFEL)

CSEFEL is focused on promoting the social emotional development and school readiness of young children birth to age 5. They have user-friendly training materials, videos, and print resources which are available directly from this website to help early care, health and education providers implement this model.

 

The National Professional Development Center on Autism Spectrum Disorders
This organization strives to promote optimal development and learning of infants, children, and youth with ASD and provide support to their families through the use of evidence-based practices. They provide resources for educators that are evidence-based.

 

National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC)
NAEYC provides accreditation for schools that meet certain standards, as well as resources, tools, and information for families and childcare providers.

 

National Association of Special Education Teachers

The National Association of Special Education Teachers (NASET) has one of the largest sources of information on special education in the United States that teachers have identified as being the most relevant issues faced in the field. The NASET database is updated daily.

 

Teaching Tips for Children and Adults with Autism
The article “Teaching Tips for Children and Adults with Autism” by Temple Grandin has 28 tips to help teachers in fostering a classroom environment conducive to learning for children with autism. Dr. Grandin is an associate professor at Colorado State University and a well-known adult with autism.

 

Young Children with Challenging Behavior
The Technical Assistance Center on Social Emotional Intervention for Young Children, also known as TACSEI, takes the research that shows which practices improve the social-emotional outcomes for young children with, or at risk for, delays or disabilities and creates free products and resources to help decision makers, caregivers, and service providers apply these best practices in the work they do every day.

 

Zero to Three
Provides professionals working with very young children and their families an extensive collection of resources aimed at supporting the work of professionals in a variety of early childhood settings.

Did you know Otters “hold hands” while sleeping, so they don’t float away from each other.

MISC. MEDICAL   


Department of Health and Human Services
Principal agency for protecting the health of U.S. citizens.


Aging With Care

AgingWithCare.com is an informational website dedicated to improving the lives of seniors and their families. ​

 

Drugs.com

Easy-to-read drug information and useful online tools, including a pill identifier.
       
Epocrates
Point of care diagnostic and treatment information for doctors. Subscription required.
       
Everyday Health
Personalized health advice, tools, and communities.

 

Evolve Wellness

Evolve Wellness provides an array of outpatient telehealth programs to ensure all clients receive the individualized resources and tools they need to help manage their condition.
   
Healthline
Publisher with an extensive library of more than 20,000 health and wellness articles.

        
Mayo Clinic
Award-winning medical and health information for healthy living.
   
MedicineNet
Authoritative medical and wellness information for consumers.

Medline Plus
Diseases, symptoms, injuries, and more with photographs and illustrations.

Medpage Today
Latest clinical and policy coverage geared towards health care professionals.


Medscape
Medical information for specialists, physicians, and industry professionals.

        
Merck Manuals
The world's most widely-used medical guides.

 

Mesothelioma Symptoms  

Mesothelioma can be very stressful, but we can make life after a diagnosis easier. Mesothelioma Resource Group is proud to help those with mesothelioma and their families pursue top medical and financial resources. Connect with us right now to get started.


NIH
Primary agency responsible for biomedical and public health research in the United States.
       
OpenMD
Health search engine spanning thousands of medical organizations and government databases.
       
RxList
Drug information for consumers and health professionals.

        
U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
Public health agency dedicated to the control and prevention of disease and injury.

 

UpToDate
Evidence-based clinical decision support resource for health care providers.

        
WebMD
Comprehensive consumer health information site.

DOCTOR REVIEWS

        
CareDash
Provider ratings and reviews, helping patients to make informed decisions about their health.
   
Castle Connoly
Top doctors based on peer nomination and review by a physician-directed research team.

        
Health Grades
Details on provider's experience, patient satisfaction, and hospital quality.

 

U.S. News Health
Directory of 750,000+ U.S. physicians and surgeons.

Vitals
Find, learn about, or rate a doctor. Search by location, specialty, or ailment.

        
Zocdoc
Find a doctor and book an appointment. Read verified doctor reviews and ratings by patients.

 

MEDICAL JOURNALS

 

BioMed Central
Provides open access to hundreds of peer-reviewed medical journals.

Free Medical Journals
Links to free full-text medical journals and resources.  

Free Medical Books

JAMA
The most widely circulated peer-reviewed medical journal in the world.

        
New England Journal of Medicine
Publishes new medical research findings, review articles, and editorial opinions.
       
PubMed Central
Free digital archive of biomedical and life sciences journal literature.

CHILD AND TEEN HEALTH

        
Baby Center
Pregnancy and parenting destination offering trusted information and advice.


Girls Health
Reliable, supportive health information for girls ages 10 to 16.

 

Partnership for a Drug-Free America
Answers and guidance on drug abuse, prevention, and treatment.

        
Teen Health
Honest information and advice about health, relationships, and growing up.

What_are_the_cleverest_scams_you_have_come_across.jpg

 

We all like to think scams could never happen to us, but that’s far from the reality. In fact, the Federal Trade Commission received

5.9 million fraud reports in 2021. And believe it or not, more young people made reports than older folks, and by quite a large margin percentage. To protect yourself from unscrupulous individuals looking for victims they can swindle, you need to arm yourself with information about common scams.You can avoid throwing your money away by not giving personal information to a stranger and looking out for these common scams.

Criminals continue to impersonate SSA and other government agencies in an attempt to obtain personal information, money, or download malware onto phones. Recent reports indicate that criminals are trying to trick people into sharing personal and financial information over the phone or through deceptive text and email messages that lure recipients to a fake Social Security website. Criminals falsely advise recipients to apply to receive Social Security benefits or extra money, such as a cost-of-living adjustment (COLA), or to set up an online account. The message may also provide fake contact information for SSA.

“Scammers are relentless in their attempts to lure you to their fake websites or to get you to respond in any manner to their fictitious offers. I urge members of the public to ignore unexpected messages and unsolicited offers. This simple step will help protect you from a scam,” said Inspector General Gail S. Ennis. “Also, be alert for unusual business practices and contact Social Security directly with questions or concerns regarding SSA matters. Never click on the link.”

 

“We are deeply concerned that fraudsters continue to find new ways to impersonate government agencies to deceive people into providing personal information or money,” said Kilolo Kijakazi, Acting Commissioner of Social Security. “I strongly urge people to be vigilant, and ignore suspicious emails, texts, or letters. If you receive a suspicious message, do not click on any links or attachments.”

Ignore suspected scams and report them to oig.ssa.gov. Reporting these scams helps us identify emerging scam tactics and trends and protects others.

HOW A GOVERNMENT IMPOSTER SCAM WORKS

Recognizing the signs of a scam can help you avoid falling victim to one. These scams primarily use telephone to contact you, but scammers may also use email, text message, social media, or U.S. mail. Scammers pretend to be from an agency or organization you know to gain your trust. Scammers say there is a problem or a prize. Scammers pressure you to act immediately. Scammers tell you to pay in a specific way.

TIPS TO PROTECT YOURSELF

Do not take immediate action. If you receive a communication that causes a strong emotional response, take a deep breath. Hang up or ignore the message. Talk to someone you trust.Do not transfer your money! Do not buy that gift card! Never pay someone who insists that you pay with a gift card, prepaid debit card, Internet currency or cryptocurrency, wire transfer, money transfer, or by mailing cash. Scammers use these forms of payment because they are hard to trace.

Be skeptical. Do not believe scammers who “transfer” your call to a government official or law enforcement officer, or who feed you a number as proof. Scammers can create fake numbers and identities. Do not trust your caller ID. Be cautious of any contact claiming to be from a government agency or law enforcement, telling you about a problem you don’t recognize or an unsolicited offer. Do not provide your personal information, even if the caller has some of your information Do not click on links or attachments. Block unwanted calls and text messages.

 

Federal Bureau Investigations

USA Common Scams

Federal Trade Commission 

Consumer Financial Protection Bureau

Internal Revenue Service 

Credit cards

Credit reports and scores

Debt collection

Fraud and scams

Money transfers

Financial Abuse 

Credit Cards for Domestic Abuse

Personal Financial

Product Liability Law

Women & Financial Literacy

Auto loans

Bank accounts and services

Mortgages

 

Payday loans

Prepaid cards

Reverse mortgages

Student loans

Help for African Americans

Single Mother Grants

The Ultimate Guide to Sustainable Investing

​Online Programs for Psychology & Counseling Degrees

Guide to Phone Scams & Protecting Yourself

inscription-street-gangs-torn-paper-glos

18th Street (National)

 

Formed in Los Angeles, 18th Street is a group of loosely associated sets or cliques led by an influential member. Membership is estimated to be 30,000 to 50,000. Approximately 80 percent of the gang's members in California are illegal aliens from Mexico and Central America. The gang is active in 50 cities in 28 states. The gang's main source of income is a retail-level distribution of cocaine and marijuana and, to a lesser extent, heroin and methamphetamine. Gang members also commit assault, auto theft, carjacking, drive-by shooting, extortion, homicide, identification fraud, and robbery.

 

Almighty Latin King and Queen Nation (National)

 

Almighty Latin King and Queen Nation (ALKQN) was formed in the 1970s by Luis Felipe. The gang shares a common culture and structure with the Chicago-based Latin Kings but does not report to Latin Kings. Membership is estimated at 2,200 to 7,500, divided among several dozen chapters operating in 25 cities in 21 states. A primary source of income is the distribution of powder cocaine, crack cocaine, and marijuana. The gang is also involved in various criminal activities, including assault, auto theft, burglary, and homicide.

 

Asian Boyz (National)

 

Asian Boyz is one of the largest Asian street gangs in the United States. Formed in southern California in the early 1970s, the gang is estimated to have 1,300 to 2,000 members operating in at least 28 cities in 14 states. Members primarily are Vietnamese or Cambodian males. Members of Asian Boyz are involved in producing, transporting, and distributing methamphetamine and MDMA and marijuana. In addition, gang members are involved in other criminal activities, including assault, burglary, drive-by shootings, and homicide.

 

Black Peace Stone Nation (National)

 

Black Peace Stone Nation, one of the largest and most violent associations of street gangs in the United States, consists of seven highly structured street gangs with a single leader and a common culture. It has an estimated 6,000 to 8,000 members, most of whom are African American males from the Chicago metropolitan area operating in 31 cities in 22 states. The gang's main source of income is the street-level distribution of cocaine, heroin, marijuana, and, to a lesser extent, methamphetamine. Members also are involved in many other types of criminal activity, including assault, auto theft, burglary, carjacking, drive-by shooting, extortion, homicide, and robbery.

 

Bloods (National)

 

Bloods is an association of structured and unstructured gangs that have adopted a single gang culture. Large, national-level Bloods gangs include Bounty Hunter Bloods and Crenshaw Mafia Gangsters. Bloods membership is estimated to be 5,000 to 20,000; most are African American males. Bloods gangs are active in 123 cities in 37 states. The main source of income for Bloods gangs is the retail-level distribution of cocaine and marijuana. Bloods members also transport and distribute methamphetamine, heroin and, to a much lesser extent, PCP (phencyclidine). The gangs also are involved in other criminal activities, including assault, auto theft, burglary, carjacking, drive-by shooting, extortion, homicide, identification fraud, and robbery.

 

Crips (National)

 

Crips is a collection of structured and unstructured gangs that have adopted a common gang culture. Crips membership is estimated to be 30,000 to 35,000; most members are African American males from the Los Angeles metropolitan area. Large, national-level Crips gangs include Insane Gangster Crips, Rolling 90s Crips, and Shotgun Crips. Crips gangs operate in 221 cities in 41 states. The main source of income for Crips gangs is the street-level distribution of powder cocaine, crack cocaine, marijuana, and PCP. The gangs also are involved in other criminal activity such as assault, auto theft, burglary, and homicide.

 

Florencia 13 (Regional)

 

Florencia 13 (F 13 or FX 13) originated in Los Angeles in the early 1960s; gang membership is estimated to be more than 3,000. The gang operates primarily in California and increasingly in Arkansas, Missouri, New Mexico, and Utah. Florencia 13 is subordinate to the Mexican Mafia (La Eme) prison gang and claims Sureños (Sur 13) affiliation. A primary source of income for gang members is the trafficking of cocaine and methamphetamine. Gang members smuggle multikilogram quantities of powder cocaine and methamphetamine obtained from sources of supply in Mexico into the United States for distribution. Also, gang members produce large quantities of methamphetamine in southern California for local distribution. Florencia members are involved in other criminal activities including assault, drive-by shooting, and homicide.

 

Fresno Bulldogs (Regional)

 

Fresno Bulldogs (Bulldogs) is a street gang that originated in Fresno, California, in the late 1960s. It is the largest Hispanic gang operating in central California, with membership estimated at 5,000 to 6,000. Bulldogs are one of the few Hispanic gangs in California that claim neither Sureños (Southern) nor Norteños (Northern) affiliation. However, gang members associate with Nuestra Familia (NF) members, particularly when trafficking drugs. The street-level distribution of methamphetamine, marijuana, and heroin is a primary source of income for gang members. In addition, members are involved in other types of criminal activity including assault, burglary, homicide, and robbery.

 

Gangster Disciples (National)

 

The Gangster Disciples street gang was formed in Chicago, Illinois, in the mid-1960s. It is structured like a corporation and is led by a chairman of the board. Gang membership is estimated to be 25,000 to 50,000; most members are African American males from the Chicago metropolitan area. The gang is active in 110 cities in 33 states. Its main source of income is the retail-level distribution of cocaine, marijuana, and heroin. The gang also is involved in other criminal activity including assault, auto theft, fraud, homicide, and money laundering.

 

Latin Disciples (Regional)

 

Latin Disciples, also known as Maniac Latin Disciples and Young Latino Organization, originated in Chicago in the late 1960s. The gang comprises at least ten structured and unstructured factions with an estimated 1,500 to 2,000 members and associate members active in at least six states. Most members are Puerto Rican males. Maniac Latin Disciples is the largest Hispanic gang in the Folk Nation Alliance. The gang is most active in the Great Lakes and Southwest Regions of the United States. The street-level distribution of powder cocaine, heroin, marijuana, and PCP is the gang's primary income source. Members also are involved in other criminal activity including assault, auto theft, carjacking, drive-by shooting, home invasion, homicide, money laundering, and weapons trafficking.

 

Latin Kings (National)

 

The Chicago-based Almighty Latin King Nation, commonly called Latin Kings, is a collection of over 160 structured gangs, referred to as chapters, operating in 158 cities in 34 states. The gang's current membership is estimated to be 20,000 to 35,000. Most members are Mexican American or Puerto Rican males. Latin Kings' main source of income is street-level distribution of cocaine, heroin, and marijuana. Gang members primarily obtain drugs from Mexican DTOs operating along the U.S.-Mexico border. Members also engage in other criminal activities such as assault, burglary, homicide, identity theft, and money laundering.

 

Mara Salvatrucha (National)

 

Mara Salvatrucha, also known as MS-13, is one of the largest Hispanic street gangs in the United States. Traditionally, the gang consisted of loosely affiliated groups known as cliques; however, law enforcement officials have reported the coordination of criminal activity among Mara Salvatrucha cliques in the Atlanta, Dallas, Los Angeles, New York, and Washington, D.C., metropolitan areas. The gang is estimated to have 30,000 to 50,000 members and associate members worldwide, 8,000 to 10,000 of whom are active in at least 38 states. According to recent law enforcement reporting, MS 13 is active in suburban areas outside Naples, Florida. Members smuggle illicit drugs, primarily powder cocaine and marijuana, into the United States and transport and distribute the drugs throughout the country. Some members also are involved in alien smuggling, assault, drive-by shooting, homicide, identification theft, prostitution operations, robbery, and weapons trafficking.

 

Tiny Rascal Gangsters (National)

 

Tiny Rascal Gangsters is one of the largest and most violent Asian street gang associations in the United States. It is composed of at least 60 structured and unstructured gangs, commonly referred to as sets, with an estimated 5,000 to 10,000 members and associates active in at least 16 states. Most members are Asian American males. The sets are most active in the Southwest, Pacific, and New England Regions. The retail-level distribution of powder cocaine, marijuana, MDMA, and methamphetamine is a primary source of income for the sets. Members also are involved in other criminal activity including assault, drive-by shooting, extortion, home invasion, homicide, robbery, and theft.

 

United Blood Nation (Regional)

 

United Blood Nation (UBN) is a loose confederation of street gangs, or sets, that once were predominantly African American but now include Asians, Caucasians, and Hispanics. UBN began in the Rikers Island Jail in New York City in 1993 and spread throughout the East Coast. Membership is estimated to be more than 7,000; members are active in seven states. UBN derives its income from street-level distribution of cocaine, heroin, and marijuana; robbery; auto theft; and smuggling of drugs to inmates in prison. UBN members also engage in arson, carjacking, credit card fraud, extortion, homicide, identity theft, intimidation, prostitution operations, and weapons distribution.

 

Vice Lord Nation (National)

 

Vice Lord Nation, based in Chicago, is a collection of structured gangs located in 74 cities in 28 states, primarily in the Great Lakes Region. Led by a national board, the various gangs comprise an estimated 30,000 to 35,000 members, most of whom are African American males. The gang's main source of income is street-level distribution of cocaine, heroin, and marijuana. Members also engage in other criminal activity such as assault, burglary, homicide, identity theft, and money laundering.

 

PRISON GANGS

 

Aryan Brotherhood (National)

 

Aryan Brotherhood, also known as AB, was originally ruled by consensus but is now highly structured with two factions--one in the California Department of Corrections (CDC) and the other in the Federal Bureau of Prisons system. The majority of members are Caucasian males, and the gang is primarily active in the Southwest and Pacific Regions. Its main source of income is the distribution of cocaine, heroin, marijuana, and methamphetamine within the prison systems as well as on the streets. Some AB members have business relationships with Mexican DTOs that smuggle illegal drugs into California for AB distribution. AB is notoriously violent and is often involved in murder-for-hire. Although historically linked to the California-based Hispanic prison gang Mexican Mafia (La Eme), tension between AB and La Eme is becoming increasingly evident as seen in recent fights between Caucasians and Hispanics within the CDC.

 

Barrio Azteca (National)

 

Barrio Azteca is one of the most violent prison gangs in the United States. The gang is highly structured and has an estimated membership of 2,000. Most members are Mexican national or Mexican American males. Barrio Azteca is most active in the Southwest Region, primarily in federal, state, and local corrections facilities in Texas and outside prison in southwestern Texas and southeastern New Mexico. The gang's main source of income is derived from smuggling heroin, powder cocaine, and marijuana from Mexico into the United States for distribution both inside and outside prisons. Gang members often transport illicit drugs across the U.S.-Mexico border for DTOs. Barrio Azteca members also are involved in alien smuggling, arson, assault, auto theft, burglary, extortion, intimidation, kidnapping, robbery, and weapons violations.

 

Black Guerrilla Family (Regional)

 

Black Guerrilla Family (BGF), originally called Black Family or Black Vanguard, is a prison gang that was founded in the San Quentin State Prison, California, in 1966. The gang is highly organized, along paramilitary lines, with a supreme leader and central committee. BGF has an established national charter, code of ethics, and oath of allegiance. BGF members operate primarily in California, Georgia, Maryland, and Missouri. The gang has 100 to 300 members, most of whom are African American males. A primary source of income for gang members is the distribution of cocaine and marijuana. BGF members obtain these drugs primarily from Nuestra Familia/Norteños members or from local Mexican traffickers. BGF members are involved in other criminal activities including auto theft, burglary, drive-by shooting, and homicide.

 

Four Horsemen, Tangos, and Tango Blast (Local)

 

Texas prison officials first noted the presence of a gang known as Four Horsemen in 1998. Some Hispanic gang members entering the Texas Department of Criminal Justice (TDCJ) from the cities of Austin, Dallas, Fort Worth, and Houston were not interested in joining an established prison gang and established Four Horsemen to protect one another and to engage in illegal activities, particularly drug trafficking, to make money. Four Horsemen became known as Tangos, because its members wore tattoos that reflected the town (or tango) in which they resided prior to incarceration. As interest in Tangos grew among Hispanic gang members entering TDCJ from other areas of Texas, Tangos from West Texas, the Rio Grande Valley, San Antonio, and El Paso were accepted. Of the eight groups now recognized as Tangos, only six are part of Tango Blast, also known as Puro Tango Blast. Tango Blast includes Tangos from the four original cities as well as the West Texas and Rio Grande Valley areas. Tango Blast differs from Tangos in that separate Tango Blast gangs sometimes band together to help one another. The gang's rapid growth poses a significant new security threat, and elements of Tango Blast within TDCJ appear to be challenging Texas Syndicate for control of illegal prison activities. Tango members appear to return to their local street gangs when released from prison, rather than continue their prison-based affiliation.

 

Hermanos de Pistoleros Latinos (Local)

 

Hermanos de Pistoleros Latinos (HPL) is a Hispanic prison gang formed in the TDCJ in the late 1980s. It operates in most prisons in Texas and on the streets in many communities in Texas, particularly Laredo. HPL is also active in several cities in Mexico, and its largest contingent in that country is located in Nuevo Laredo. The gang is structured and is estimated to have 1,000 members. Gang members maintain close ties to several Mexican DTOs and are involved in the trafficking of large quantities of cocaine and marijuana from Mexico into the United States for distribution.

 

Mexican Mafia (National)

 

The Mexican Mafia prison gang, also known as La Eme (Spanish for the letter M), was formed in the late 1950s within the California Department of Corrections (CDC). It is loosely structured and has strict rules that must be followed by the estimated 350 to 400 members. Most members are Mexican American males who previously belonged to a southern California street gang. Mexican Mafia is active in 13 states, but its power base is in California. The gang's main source of income is extorting drug distributors outside prison and distributing methamphetamine, cocaine, heroin, and marijuana within the prison systems and on the streets. Some members have direct links to Mexican DTOs and broker deals for themselves and their associates. Mexican Mafia also is involved in other criminal activities including controlling gambling and homosexual prostitution in prison.

 

Mexikanemi (National)

 

The Mexikanemi prison gang (also known as Texas Mexican Mafia or Emi) was formed in the early 1980s within the TDCJ. The gang is highly structured and is estimated to have 2,000 members, most of whom are Mexican national or Mexican American males who were living in Texas at the time of incarceration. Mexikanemi poses a significant drug trafficking threat to communities in the Southwest Region, particularly in Texas. Gang members reportedly traffic multikilogram quantities of powder cocaine, heroin, and methamphetamine; and multiton quantities of marijuana from Mexico into the United States for distribution inside and outside prison. Gang members obtain drugs from associates or members of the Osiel Cárdenas-Guíllen, and/or Vicente Carrillo-Fuentes Mexican DTOs. In addition, Mexikanemi members possibly maintain a relationship with Los Zetas, which is associated with a Gulf Cartel.

 

Nazi Low Riders (Regional)

 

Nazi Low Riders (NLR) is a violent California-based prison gang that subscribes to a white supremacist philosophy. The gang has 800 to 1,000 members, most of whom are Caucasian males with a history of street gang activity and drug abuse. NLR operates in correctional facilities and communities, primarily in the Pacific and Southwest Regions. The gang's primary sources of income are derived from the distribution of multiounce to multipound quantities of methamphetamine, retail-level distribution of heroin and marijuana, and extortion of independent Caucasian drug dealers and other white supremacist gangs. Members also engage in violent criminal activity such as armed robbery, assault, assault with deadly weapons, murder, and attempted murder; in addition they commit identity fraud, money laundering, witness intimidation, and witness retaliation.

 

Ñeta (National)

 

Ñeta is a prison gang that began in Puerto Rico and spread to the United States. Ñeta is one of the largest and most violent prison gangs, with about 7,000 members in Puerto Rico and 5,000 in the United States. Ñeta chapters in Puerto Rico exist exclusively inside prisons; once members are released from prison they no longer are considered to be part of the gang. In the United States Ñeta chapters exist both inside and outside prisons within 36 cities in nine states, primarily in the Northeast Region. The gang's main source of income is the retail-level distribution of powder and crack cocaine, heroin, marijuana and, to a lesser extent, LSD (lysergic acid diethylamide), MDMA, methamphetamine, and PCP. Ñeta members also commit such crimes as assault, auto theft, burglary, drive-by shooting, extortion, home invasion, money laundering, robbery, weapons and explosives trafficking, and witness intimidation.

 

Public Enemy Number One (Local)

 

Public Enemy Number One (PEN1) is the fastest-growing Caucasian prison gang, with an estimated 400 to 500 members operating in prisons and communities in California and, to a much lesser extent, in locations throughout the Northeast, Pacific, Southwest, Southeast, and West Central Regions of the country. PEN1 members espouse a white supremacist philosophy and pose a criminal threat inside and outside prison because of their alliance with AB and NLR. Gang members derive their income from distributing midlevel and retail-level quantities of methamphetamine. In addition, members engage in violent criminal activity such as assault, attempted murder, and homicide as well as auto theft, burglary, identity theft, and property crimes.

 

Sureños and Norteños (National/National)

 

As individual Hispanic street gang members enter the prison systems, they put aside former rivalries with other Hispanic street gangs and unite under the name Sureños or Norteños. The original Mexican Mafia members, most of whom were from southern California, considered Mexicans from the rural, agricultural areas of northern California as weak and viewed them with contempt. To distinguish themselves from the agricultural workers or farmers from northern California, members of Mexican Mafia began to refer to the Hispanic gang members that worked for them as Sureños (Southerners). Inmates from northern California became known as Norteños (Northerners) and are affiliated with NF. Because of its size and strength, Fresno Bulldogs is the only Hispanic gang in CDC that does not fall under Sureños or Norteños but remains independent. Sureños gang members' main sources of income are the retail-level distribution of cocaine, heroin, marijuana, and methamphetamine both within prison systems and in the community, as well as the extortion of drug distributors on the streets. Some members have direct links to Mexican DTOs and broker deals for Mexican Mafia as well as their own gang. Sureños gangs also are involved in other criminal activities such as assault, carjacking, home invasion, homicide, and robbery. Norteños gang members' main sources of income are the retail-level distribution of cocaine, heroin, marijuana, methamphetamine, and PCP within prison systems and in the community, as well as the extortion of drug distributors on the streets. Norteños gangs also are involved in other criminal activities such as assault, carjacking, home invasion, homicide, and robbery.

 

Texas Syndicate (Regional)

 

Texas Syndicate (TS) is one of the largest and most violent prison gangs; it is active on both sides of the U.S.-Mexico border and poses a significant drug trafficking threat to communities in the Southwest Region. The gang is highly structured and is estimated to have 1,300 members, most of whom are Mexican American males between 20 and 40 years of age. Gang members smuggle multikilogram quantities of powder cocaine, heroin, and methamphetamine and multiton quantities of marijuana from Mexico into the United States for distribution inside and outside prison. Gang members have a direct working relationship with associates and/or members of the Osiel Cárdenas-Guillén DTO. In addition, TS members possibly maintain a relationship with Los Zetas.

 

OUTLAW MOTORCYCLE GANGS

 

Bandidos (National)

 

Bandidos, an OMG with 2,000 to 2,500 members in the United States and 13 other countries, is a growing criminal threat to the nation. Law enforcement authorities estimate that Bandidos is one of the two largest OMGs in the United States, with approximately 900 members belonging to over 93 chapters. Bandidos is involved in transporting and distributing cocaine and marijuana and producing, transporting, and distributing methamphetamine. Bandidos is most active in the Pacific, Southeast, Southwest, and West Central Regions and is expanding in these regions by forming new chapters and allowing members of support clubs--"uppet" or "duck" club members who have sworn allegiance to another club and whose purpose is to do the "dirty work" of the mother club--to form or join Bandidos chapters.

 

Black Pistons Motorcycle Club (National)

 

Black Pistons Motorcycle Club is the official support club of Outlaws Motorcycle Club. Established in 2002 with the backing of Outlaws, Black Pistons has expanded rapidly throughout the United States and into Canada and Europe. The OMG has an estimated 70 domestic chapters in 20 states and an unknown number of foreign chapters in Belgium, Canada, Germany, Great Britain, Norway, and Poland. The exact number of members is unknown but is estimated to be more than 200 in the United States. The Outlaws OMG uses Black Pistons chapters as sources of prospective Outlaws members. The Outlaws OMG also uses Black Pistons chapters to conduct criminal activity, especially transporting and distributing drugs. Black Piston members engage in assault, extortion, fraud, intimidation, and theft.

 

Hells Angels Motorcycle Club (National)

 

Hells Angels Motorcycle Club (HAMC) is an OMG with 2,000 to 2,500 members belonging to over 230 chapters in the United States and 26 foreign countries. HAMC poses a criminal threat on six continents. U.S. law enforcement authorities estimate that HAMC has more than 92 chapters in 27 states with over 800 members. HAMC members produce, transport, and distribute marijuana and methamphetamine and transport and distribute cocaine, hashish, heroin, LSD, MDMA, PCP, and diverted pharmaceuticals. HAMC members engage in other criminal activity including assault, extortion, homicide, money laundering, and motorcycle theft.

 

Mongols Motorcycle Club (Regional)

 

Mongols Motorcycle Club is an extremely violent OMG that poses a serious criminal threat to the Pacific and Southwest Regions of the United States. Mongols members transport and distribute cocaine, marijuana, and methamphetamine and frequently commit violent crimes including assault, intimidation, and murder to defend Mongols territory and uphold its reputation. Most of the club's 300 members are Hispanic males who live in the Los Angeles area, and many are former street gang members with a long history of using violence to settle grievances. In the 1980s, the Mongols OMG seized control of southern California from the HAMC, and today it is allied with Bandidos, Outlaws, Sons of Silence, and Pagan's OMGs against the HAMC. The Mongols OMG also maintains ties to Hispanic street gangs in Los Angeles.

 

Outlaws Motorcycle Club (National)

 

Outlaws has more than 1,700 members belonging to 176 chapters in the United States and 12 foreign countries. U.S. law enforcement authorities estimate that Outlaws has more than 86 chapters in 21 states with over 700 members. Outlaws also identifies itself as the A.O.A. (American Outlaws Association) and Outlaws Nation. Outlaws is the dominant OMG in the Great Lakes Region. Gang members produce, transport, and distribute methamphetamine and transport and distribute cocaine, marijuana and, to a lesser extent, MDMA. Outlaws members engage in various criminal activities including arson, assault, explosives operations, extortion, fraud, homicide, intimidation, kidnapping, money laundering, prostitution operations, robbery, theft, and weapons violations. It competes with the HAMC for membership and territory.

 

Pagan's Motorcycle Club (Regional)

 

Pagan's Motorcycle Club is a violent OMG whose members distribute cocaine, methamphetamine, marijuana, and PCP. It is one of the more prominent OMGs in the Mid-Atlantic Region. Pagan's OMG has an estimated 200 to 250 members among 41 chapters in 11 states. The club has been linked to traditional organized crime (TOC) groups in New York, Philadelphia, and Pittsburgh and engages in criminal activities such as arson, assault, bombing, extortion, and murder.

 

Vagos Motorcycle Club (National)

 

Vagos OMG has hundreds of members in the United States and Mexico and poses a serious criminal threat to those areas in which its chapters are located. Law enforcement agencies report that Vagos has approximately 300 members among 24 chapters in California, Hawaii, Nevada, and Oregon, and three chapters in Mexico. Vagos members produce, transport, and distribute methamphetamine and distribute marijuana. Vagos Members also have been implicated in other criminal activities including assault, extortion, insurance fraud, money laundering, murder, vehicle theft, weapons violations, and witness intimidation.

At least 23 gangs have been identified by law enforcement officials as national-level gangs operating in multiple states and/or numerous major drug markets. Moreover, law enforcement officials have documented connections between transnational DTOs and 11 national-level street gangs, national-level prison gangs, four national-level OMGs, two regional-level street gangs, one regional-level prison gang, and three local prison gangs. Some of these gangs have confronted our company throughout the years.

Below is a list of National-Level Street, Prison, and Outlaw Motorcycle Gang Profiles.

LGBTQ

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        The history of the Disneyland Resort is well documented.

  • Disneyland first opened July 17, 1955, and was the world's first Disney park - Disney World in Florida opened in 1971, and Disney's California Adventure opened in 2001. 

  • In its more than 55 year history, the park has entertained more than 515 million guests. 

  • The Disneyland Monorail was the first daily operating monorail to open in the western hemisphere when it debuted in 1959. 

  • The top floor of the fire station on Main Street USA was Walt Disney's private apartment during the park's construction. It is still furnished but is not open to the public, though a light is left burning in one of its windows each day in tribute to Walt. 

  • The original price of the park's land and initial attractions was $16 million. 

  • The drawbridge on Sleeping Beauty Castle is real and has been raised and lowered twice; once when the park first opened, and again in 1983 when Fantasyland was rededicated. 

  • The Matterhorn Bobsleds coaster was the first tubular steel roller coaster in the world when it opened in 1959, and as such it revolutionized the design and construction of roller coasters. 

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